• Mr. Tucker

    English 9

    Class information for 9/14/20:

    Period 2:

    • Students click on the following link to go to class:  Zoom Link for Per. 2
      • Meeting ID: 843 3764 5657
      • Passcode: 541230
      • Lesson Plans click here

    Period 3:

    • Students click on the following link to go to class:  Zoom Link for Per. 3
      • Meeting ID: 871 1721 4023
      • Passcode: 495666
      • Lesson Plans click here

    This is Week Eight- click here to download week eight (May 25-31)

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    This is Week 7, click here to download (May 17-24)

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    This week six's file, please download.

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    This is the file for week five, please download

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    Previous weeks are below.

     

    Click here to download the file for Week Four ⇐ Click here!! Download file for Week Four  Write the paragrphs in Word or Google Docs or wherever you normally write the paragraphs and then upload to turnitin.com

    Download week four in the above file.

    This is the PDF file for week three

    Click here to download week three ⇐ Click here!! Download file for Week Three (this should work on any device as it's is a PDF)

    It is also copied and pasted below:

     Course: English 9                                                                     Name:                                                                                             Period:                                                      

    Week #3 Assignment: April 20-26, 2020

    Teachers: MacDonald, Ternes, Forkus, Ondek, Mauro, Tucker, & Eliot

     
     
     

    Teacher: Mrs. Alexandria Tucker

    Preferred method of submission: Turnitin.com, email only if turnitin.com isn’t working. Paper packets can be submitted to your student’s den.

    Contact Information: tuckera@luhsd.net

     
     
     

    Instructions:  

    Refer to YOUR teacher’s instructions on how to submit the assignment. Their contact information is labeled above.

    Due Date: Sunday, April 26th, 2020 at 11:59pm.

    Reminder: Please do your own work. Plagiarized work will not receive credit.

    Instructions:

    1. Read the short story, “Eleven.”
    2. Answer the questions following the story.
    3. Respond to the writing prompt in 150-300 words.

    Modifications (ELD/IEP/504): All accommodations continue through distance learning. If you need more assistance, please contact your teacher.

    1. Read the short story, “Eleven.”
    2. Answer at least two questions.
    3. Respond to the writing prompt in at least 75 words. You may use the following sentence starters:
    • From the story we learn that who you are is…
    • I have learned from my own life experience that who you are is…
    • Age does/does not determine who you are because…
    • You change as you age by…


     

     

    Eleven

    by Sandra Cisneros

     

    Sandra Cisneros is an American writer and a key figure in Chicana literature. Her writing frequently draws on her experiences as an only daughter in a family of six brothers, as well as her family’s migration between Mexico and the United States. In this short story, a young girl thinks about the meaning of her birthday.

     

    What they don’t understand about birthdays and what they never tell you is that when you’re eleven, you’re also ten, and nine, and eight, and seven, and six, and five, and four, and three, and two, and one. And when you wake up on your eleventh birthday you expect to feel eleven, but you don’t. You open your eyes and everything’s just like yesterday, only it’s today. And you don’t feel eleven at all. You feel like you’re still ten. And you are—underneath the year that makes you eleven.

    Like some days you might say something stupid, and that’s the part of you that’s still ten. Or maybe some days you might need to sit on your mama’s lap because you’re scared, and that’s the part of you that’s five. And maybe one day when you’re all grown up maybe you will need to cry like if you’re three, and that’s okay. That’s what I tell Mama when she’s sad and needs to cry. Maybe she’s feeling three.

    Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings inside a tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other, each year inside the next one. That’s how being eleven years old is.

    You don’t feel eleven. Not right away. It takes a few days, weeks even, sometimes even months before you say Eleven when they ask you. And you don’t feel smart eleven, not until you’re almost twelve. That’s the way it is.

    Only today I wish I didn’t have only eleven years rattling inside me like pennies in a tin Band-Aid box. Today I wish I was one hundred and two instead of eleven because if I was one hundred and two I’d have known what to say when Mrs. Price put the red sweater on my desk. I would’ve known how to tell her it wasn’t mine instead of just sitting there with that look on my face and nothing coming out of my mouth.

    “Whose is this?” Mrs. Price says, and she holds the red sweater up in the air for all the class to see. “Whose? It’s been sitting in the coatroom for a month.”

    “Not mine,” says everybody. “Not me.”

    “It has to belong to somebody,” Mrs. Price keeps saying, but nobody can remember. It’s an ugly sweater with red plastic buttons and a collar and sleeves all stretched out like you could use it for a jump rope. It’s maybe a thousand years old and even if it belonged to me I wouldn’t say so.

    Maybe because I’m skinny, maybe because she doesn’t like me, that stupid Sylvia Saldivar says, “I think it belongs to Rachel.” An ugly sweater like that all raggedy and old, but Mrs. Price believes her. Mrs. Price takes the sweater and puts it right on my desk, but when I open my mouth nothing comes out. “That’s not, I don’t, you’re not…Not mine.” I finally say in a little voice that was maybe me when I was four.

    “Of course it’s yours, ”Mrs. Price says. “I remember you wearing it once.” Because she’s older and the teacher, she’s right and I’m not.

    Not mine, not mine, not mine, but Mrs. Price is already turning to page thirty-two, and math problem number four. I don’t know why but all of a sudden I’m feeling sick inside, like the part of me that’s three wants to come out of my eyes, only I squeeze them shut tight and bite down on my teeth real hard and try to remember today I am eleven, eleven. Mama is making a cake for me for tonight, and when Papa comes home everybody will sing Happy birthday, happy birthday to you.

    But when the sick feeling goes away and I open my eyes, the red sweater’s still sitting there like a big red mountain. I move the red sweater to the corner of my desk with my ruler. I move my pencil and books and eraser as far from it as possible. I even move my chair a little to the right. Not mine, not mine, not mine.

    In my head I’m thinking how long till lunchtime, how long till I can take the red sweater and throw it over the schoolyard fence, or leave it hanging on a parking meter, or bunch it up into a little ball and toss it in the alley. Except when math period ends Mrs. Price says loud and in front of everybody, “Now, Rachel, that’s enough,” because she sees I’ve shoved the red sweater to the tippy-tip corner of my desk and it’s hanging all over the edge like a waterfall, but I don’t care.

    “Rachel, ”Mrs. Price says. She says it like she’s getting mad. “You put that sweater on right now and no more nonsense.”

    “But it’s not –“

    “Now!” Mrs. Price says.

    This is when I wish I wasn’t eleven because all the years inside of me—ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, and one—are pushing at the back of my eyes when I put one arm through one sleeve of the sweater that smells like cottage cheese, and then the other arm through the other and stand there with my arms apart like if the sweater hurts me and it does, all itchy and full of germs that aren’t even mine.

    That’s when everything I’ve been holding in since this morning, since when Mrs. Price put the sweater on my desk, finally lets go, and all of a sudden I’m crying in front of everybody. I wish I was invisible but I’m not. I’m eleven and it’s my birthday today and I’m crying like I’m three in front of everybody. I put my head down on the desk and bury my face in my stupid clown-sweater arms. My face all hot and spit coming out of my mouth because I can’t stop the little animal noises from coming out of me until there aren’t any more tears left in my eyes, and it’s just my body shaking like when you have the hiccups, and my whole head hurts like when you drink milk too fast.

    But the worst part is right before the bell rings for lunch. That stupid Phyllis Lopez, who is even dumber than Sylvia Saldivar, says she remembers the red sweater is hers. I take it off right away and give it to her, only Mrs. Price pretends like everything’s okay.

    Today I’m eleven. There’s a cake Mama’s making for tonight and when Papa comes home from work we’ll eat it. There’ll be candles and presents and everybody will sing Happy birthday, happy birthday to you, Rachel, only it’s too late. I’m eleven today.

    I’m eleven, ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, and one, but I wish I was one hundred and two. I wish I was anything but eleven. Because I want today to be far away already, far away like a runaway balloon, like a tiny o in the sky, so tiny—tiny you have to close your eyes to see it.

     

    Questions

    1. What point of view is the story told from? What emotions does the author emphasize through the point of view?

     

     

    1. In paragraph 3, Rachel says, “Because the way you grow old is kind of like an onion or like the rings inside a tree trunk or like my little wooden dolls that fit one inside the other.” Identify the type of figurative language being used in this sentence and explain the quote.

     

     

     

    1. In your opinion, why does Rachel get so upset about being told to put on the red sweater?

     

     

     

     

     

    1. Why does Rachel wish she was older? Do you agree or disagree with Rachel’s ideas about wanting to grow up?

     

     

     

    1. If you were to write your own short story, like this one, about a time in your life when you were older or younger than you actually were, what would the story be about and what would the title be?

     

     

     

    Writing Prompt:

    Based on the story and your own experiences, what makes you who you are? Do you think age determines the person you are? How do you change as you age?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     

    Email me with any questions- my office hours are 11-2 (meaning if you email me during those times, you can expect a speedy response).

    tuckera@luhsd.net

    Please upload all work to turnitin.com.

    The class IDs are below:

    Period one: 22294065
    Period three: 22294144
    Period four:22294164
    Period five:22326190
    Period six:22328120
    Period seven: 22333531
     
    The enrollment keys are as follows:
    Period one: 111111
    Period three: 333333
    Period four:444444
    Period five:555555
    Period six:123456
    Period seven: 777777

     

     

    Rubric for all distance learning assignments:

    English 1 Distance Learning Assignment Rubric 

    All distance learning specific assignments generated by the English 1 team will be accessed using the following criteria to provide consistency and equity for all students. 

    (4) Full Credit 

    (2) Half Credit 

    (0) No Credit 

    Notes: 

    The assignment 

    • Fulfilled the length requirement 
    • Was comprehensible or contained errors that did not interfere with meaning 
    • Fully responded to the prompt, providing a complete response to all elements 

    The assignment 

    • Partially fulfilled the length requirement (less than 2/3’s) 
    • Had errors that interfere with meaning but was mostly comprehensible 
    • Partially responded to the prompt, though certain areas were missing 

    The assignment 

    • Was not submitted or was incomplete 
    • Had multiple errors that interfere with meaning and was mostly incomprehensible 
    • Did not respond to all elements of the prompt 

    *feedback or rationale to support score specific to the elements of the rubric. 

    *accommodations and/or modification used or given for EL and IEP/504 students 

     

     

    Course: English 9 

    Week #2 Assignment: April 13-17, 2020 

    Teachers: MacDonald, Ternes, Forkus, Ondek, Mauro, Tucker, & Eliot 

     
     
     

    Teacher: Mrs. Alexandria Tucker  

    Preferred method of submission: Turnitin.com, email only if turnitin.com isn’t working. Paper packets can be submitted to your student’s den.  

    Contact Information: tuckera@luhsd.net  

     
     
     

    Instructions:  

    1) Read the following directions carefully. 

    2) Read the key terms to help you understand the passage. 

    3) Read the passage; think about what you are reading and how it applies to your own life.  

    4)  Re-read the Writing Situation and the Writing Directions.  Complete writing an essay of the appropriate length. You will be assessed on completion, depth of thinking, and grammar. The writing piece needs to use three key terms, IEP/504: 2 key terms.  

    Refer to YOUR teacher’s instructions on how to submit the assignment. Their contact information is labeled above.  

    Due Date: Sunday, April 19th, 2020 at 11:59pm.  

    Reminder: Please do your own work. Plagiarized work will not receive credit. 

    Writing Situation:  Novelist Zadie Smith wrote a reflection on her role model,  the Nobel laureate writer Toni Morrison who just recently passed.  Ms. Smith recalls how important Ms. Morrison’s books were to her as a young girl and as a developing writer.  “Toni Morrison put herself in the service of her people, as few writers have ever been called upon to do.” Ms. Smith learned to “love her black culture as noble and worthy of glory”.   This role model made Zadie Smith feel like she could pursue her dream of becoming a writer.   

    Writing Directions:  Write a 300-500 word essay that first explains what Ms. Smith admires in the writing of Toni Morrison, and why Ms. Morrison is her role model.   Be sure to include two important quotations from the article that capture her feelings toward Ms. Morrison’s writing and explain them.  Then think about your own life and about the role models that have formed your character.  Perhaps you have an inspiring family member or older friend; perhaps you have been shaped or changed by someone in the media or in our national life.  Write about the person who is your role model, the person who has influenced your life the most.  What specific lessons has that individual taught you, and why have you taken these lessons into your heart?  USE AT LEAST THREE KEY TERMS. MLA FORMAT. Uploaded to turnitin.com only.

    Modifications (ELD/IEP/504):  All modifications continue through distance learning.  If you need more assistance please contact your teacherPlease review the vocabulary, read the article, and then write a 150-300 word  ( 1 page single-spaced if handwritten) reflection on a person who has deeply influenced your life and what important life lessons they have taught you.  USE AT LEAST TWO KEY TERMS. MLA FORMAT. Uploaded to turnitin.com only.

    Key Terms: 

    1.) Linguistic: something that involves language 

    2.) Metaphoric: something that is compared to             something else. 

    3.) Aesthetic: someone’s ideas about style and               beauty. 

    4.) Existential: something related to existence. 

    5.) Smug: to be pleased with oneself. 

    6.) Familial: relating to one’s family. 

    7.) Discourse: talking; conversation.  

    8.) Keatsian: rich language often praising the gift of life 

    9.) Shakespearian: complex, subtle, and powerful 

    10.) Conceiving: to form an idea or opinion.  

    11.) Abundant: plentiful, large in number. 

    12.) Compulsive: a powerful irresistible effect 

    13.) Sub-clauses: a group of words that cannot        work on its own because it is not a complete            thought.  

    14.) Oratory: a skillful way with words in public       speaking. 

    15.) Inconclusive: without a result or                 outcome. 

    16.) Nondefinitive: not having a fixed or final            form.  

     

    17.) Ambivalent: having mixed feelings about          someone or something. 

    18.) Calcified: to make or become unmoving or        unchanging; petrified.  

    19.) Commodity: something of use, advantage, or   value. 

    20.) Thwarting: to successfully oppose or                  prevent. 

    21.) Subconscious: not fully aware. 

    22.) Self-loathing: strongly disliking oneself. 

    23.) Demonizing: to make something seem evil. 

    24.) Astonishing: overpowering wonder, surprise,  or amazement.  

    25.) Sustained: to keep going; to support 

    26.) Critique: to judge or discuss the flaws of   something. 

    27.) Ennobling: to honor something. 

    28.) Rejoinders: to answer or reply to something;    a  rebuttal 

    29.) Endowed: to be gifted or graced. 

    30.) Exalted: to be praised or honored. 

    31.) Inheritance: possessions that are gained.  

    32.) Forebear: an ancestor, a forefather.  

     

     

    Weekly Reading: 

    DAUGHTERS OF TONI: A REMEMBRANCE 

    By: Zadie SmithAugust 7, 2019 

    Author Zadie Smith reflects on the life and influence of Toni Morrison as part of PEN America’s tribute to the late Nobel laureate. 

    I read Toni Morrison’s early novels very young, probably a little too young, when I was around ten years old. I couldn’t always follow her linguistic experiments or the density of her metaphoric expressions, but at that age what mattered more even than her writing was the fact of her. Her books lined our living room shelves and appeared in multiple copies, as if my mother was trying to reassure herself that Morrison was here to stay. It’s hard now, in 2019, to recreate or describe the bottomless need she answered. There was no “black girl magic,” in London, in 1985. Indeed, as far as the broader culture was concerned, there was no black girl anything, outside of singing, dancing, and perhaps running. On my mother’s shelves there certainly were “black woman writers,” and “Toni” was first amongst them, but no such being was ever mentioned in any class I ever attended, and I can’t remember ever seeing one on the TV or in the papers or anywhere else. Reading The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, and Tar Baby for the first time was therefore more than an aesthetic or psychological experience, it was existential. Like a lot of black girls of my generation, I placed Morrison, in her single person, in an impossible role. I wanted to see her name on the spine of a book and feel some of the same lazy assumption and smug confidence of familial relation, of inherited potential, that any Anglo-Saxon boy in school felt—no matter how unlettered or indifferent to literature—whenever he heard the name of William Shakespeare, say, or John Keats. No writer should have to bear such a burden. What’s extraordinary about Morrison is that she not only wanted that burden, she was equal to it. She knew we needed her to be not just a writer but a discourse and she became one, making her language out of whole cloth, and conceiving of each novel as a project, as a mission—never as mere entertainment. Just as there is a Keatsian sentence and a Shakespearean one, so Morrison made a sentence distinctly hers, abundant in compulsive, self-generating metaphor, as full of sub-clauses as a piece of 19th century presidential oratory, and always faithful to the central belief that narrative language—inconclusive, non-definitive, ambivalent, twisting, metaphorical narrative language, with its roots in oral culture—can offer a form of wisdom distinct from and in opposition to, as she put it, the “calcified language of the academy or the commodity driven language of science.”  

    The thwarting of human potential was her great theme, but there was nothing subconscious or accidental about it—she couldn’t afford there to be. In The Bluest Eye, for example, how do you write about self-loathing without submitting to the same? Or demonizing the habit? Or handing the power of victory precisely to the culture that has created the feeling? All of it had to be thought through, and she thought about all of it, as a working novelist but also as a critic and academic. To me the most astonishing section of her final book of essays, The Source of Self Regard, is the level of sustained academic critique she was able to bring to bear upon her own novels, like an architect walking you through a building she’d made, with the same consciousness of its beauty but also of its use. Toni Morrison put herself in the service of her people, as few writers have ever been called upon to do, and she claimed it as a privilege. A large part of the project was the ennobling of black culture itself and its deliberate encasement in a vocabulary worthy of its glories. To those who considered the entrance to her buildings narrow she had many famous rejoinders. And now—in no small part because of her determination not to be swayed from her project—we of course understand that there are no such things as narrow entrances into the houses of history, experience, and culture. For when it comes to ways of telling, ways of seeing, every man’s story is infinite. Every black woman’s, too. This infinite terrain is what she opened up for girls like me who had feared otherwise. 

    In 1992, my mother’s close friend, the Ghanaian born, legendary Black-British publisher Margaret Busby, published the first volume of Daughters of Africa, in which Morrison was of course included, alongside more than two hundred contributors. Its title came from the words of Maria W. Stewart, the first African-American woman to give public lectures: “O, ye daughters of Africa, awake! awake! arise! no longer sleep nor slumber, but distinguish yourselves. Show forth to the world that ye are endowed with noble and exalted faculties.” A year after that, Morrison won the Nobel Prize. A year after that, I went to university to embark on a course of English Literature which included not a single daughter of Africa nor any sons either. Change was a long time coming, but Morrison stayed out front, leading us into the future, like a pilot light. This year, Margaret published the second volume of Daughters of Africa, equally large, in which many of the writers are not only daughters of Africa but also, metaphorically speaking, daughters of Morrison—a category in which I include myself. Morrison rejected the very concept of the narrow door and claimed for herself the wide world. She enriched our literary inheritance, and now every school child, whatever their background, can inherit Morrison as a literary forebear, a great American writer, who is as available to them—as ‘universal’—as any other writer in the canon. All readers and writers are indebted to her for the space she created. 

    Zadie Smith is an English novelist, essayist, and short story writer. She is the author of White Teeth, The Autograph Man, On Beauty, Changing My Mind, and NW, among other works. 

     

     

     

     

    Course: English 9 

    Week #1 Assignment (This is now an old assignment): April 6-10, 2020 

    Teachers: MacDonald, Ternes, Forkus, Ondek, Mauro, Tucker, & Eliot 

     
     
     

    Teacher: Mrs. Alexandria Tucker  

    Preferred method of submission: Turnitin.com, email only if turnitin.com isn’t working. Paper packets can be submitted to your student’s den.  

    Contact Information: tuckera@luhsd.net  

     
     
     

    Instructions:  

    1) Read the following directions carefully. 

    2) Read the key terms to help you understand the passage. 

    3) Read the passage; think about what you are reading and how it applies to your own life.  

    4)  Re-read the Writing Situation and the Writing Directions.  Complete writing an essay of the appropriate length. You will be assessed on completion, depth of thinking, and grammar.    

    Refer to YOUR teacher’s instructions on how to submit the assignment. Their contact information is labeled above.  

    Due Date: Sunday, April 12th, 2020 at 11:59pm.  

    Reminder: Please do your own work. Plagiarized work will not receive credit.  

    Writing Situation:  An old proverb states, “Character is what you are in the dark,” and it is in the darkest of times that who we are sometimes shines through. . . We cannot live and we cannot grow without the realization that we are not living perfectly and that we have ideals to grow towards, and revealing these aspirations is the true value of adversity.”  It is only by living through challenging times that we have the chance to show who we really are and what we really believe.  We have to walk the walk and not just talk the talk. 

    Writing Directions:  Review the vocabulary list, read the article, and then write a 300-500 word (roughly two pages single spaced if handwritten) reflection on how the Coronavirus crisis has encouraged people to prove what they really believe.  Some people are showing incredible bravery, kindness, creativity, and resourcefulness.  Some people are behaving selfishly, dangerously, and greedily.  Just watch the news for several examples and write about them. You could write about mask hoarding, panic buying, or other related topics.  If you want to write about yourself, think about your life and how this challenge has forced you to grow so that you live your ideals.  How are you taking care of yourself, your family, your pets, your community? 

    The writing piece needs to use three key terms, IEP/504: 2 key terms. Please spellcheck and look for typos before submission as this will not be able to be redone unless stated in accommodations. 

    Modifications (ELD/IEP/504): All accommodations continue through distance learning. If you need more assistance, please contact your teacher. Please review the vocabulary list, read the article, and then write a 150-300 word (1 page single space if handwritten) reflection per the directions above. Contact your teacher for reader services.  

     Key Terms: 

    1. Proverb: A very old, short, popular saying that tells a truth or useful thought.
    2. Adversity: Negative or unfortunate situations, conditions, fortune, or fate.
    3. Rousting: To motivate; to awaken.
    4. Prosperity: Positive or fortunate situations, conditions, fortune, or fate.
    5. Stimulus: Something that stirs up or encourages action, feeling, or thought
    6. Provokes: To bring out, or to cause an action, feeling, or thought. (Like a stimulus but this is the action (verb) of  causing action feeling or thought where a stimulus is an object (noun).
    7. Elicit: To bring out, similar to provoke.
    8. Analogize: To make use of an analogy (a similarity or ability to compare two things) in an argument.
    9. Imperative: Extremely important, necessary, or required.
    10. Algorithm: A set of rules for solving a problem in an exact number of steps.
    11. Organism: A form of life; an animal, plant, fungus, etc.
    12. Engender: To cause to happen, to provoke.
    13. Utopia: A perfect place.
    14. Ideals: An example or standard of excellence or perfection.
    15. Aspirations:  A goal, purpose, or objective that is strongly wanted or desired.

     Academic Vocabulary: 

    1. Summarize: a brief statement of writing that revisits the most important parts of the article.
    2. Quotation: a repeated sentence, passage, or phrase from a piece of writing.
    3. Reflection: thinking about something with careful attention.
    4. Explain: to describe; to help your reader understand by teaching.

     

    Weekly Text: "There Is VALUE in ADVERSITY” 

    An old proverb states, “Character is what you are in the dark,” and it is in the darkest of times that who we are sometimes shines through. Nelson Mandela, Stephen Hawking, Lance Armstrong—our society loves to hear of a person who triumphs through adversity. But would these talents and achievements have arisen anyway—or more easily if there had been no adversity? Possibly, but I agree with Roman poet Horace in that adversity has a way of rousting talent from slumber. Adversity can stimulate, force, and sharpen a person in ways prosperity cannot; there is, then, value in hardship.  

     Biology teaches us that a stimulus will elicit a response. Newton taught us that one force provokes another, in opposition to it. While various life experiences might “elicit” a response, adversity may analogize better with physics than biology. It does not simply request a response; it demands it. Otherwise, the adversity will never be lifted and hardship will prevail. Hamlet’s tragic flaw was indecision, and Shakespeare no doubt understood that those in adversity must learn to be capable of a response if they are to survive.  

    Survival, of course, is a powerful motivator. Evolution runs on it; in this sense every organism on the planet works due to adversity. This survival imperative is so powerful, it has been used beyond the biological creatures into whom it is hardwired. Computers now make use of genetic algorithms, in which competing solutions to a problem—say, the correct shape of an aircraft wing—are selected, mathematically “bred,” and mutated into a new generation. Adversity, it seems, elicits talents in more than humans.  

    Prosperity, on the other hand, does not always engender growth. The prosperous man has no pressing needs or emergencies that require him to develop talents to counter them. Brave New World provides a literary example. The people in this “utopia” are always fed. They are always happy. There is infinite entertainment, in all imaginable forms. But there is no growth. When the leader of this society asks an outsider if he truly wants pain, death and hardship, the “savage” simply replies, “I claim them all” and took with him all the good things the “prosperous” lacked: love, family, Shakespeare, and much more.  

     In fiction, a character often ends a story realizing far more than he did when he began. The conflicts and resolutions he has been through have forced it on him. Character development is not merely a literary construct; it exists in life. We cannot live and we cannot grow without the realization that we are not living perfectly and that we have ideals to grow towards, and revealing these aspirations is the true value of adversity.